PURELY TANZANIA

FAQ

+ What is included in your prices and what are additional costs?

All our prices are quoted in US dollars (US$) per person and in general consist of park entrance fees, rescue fees, camping/hut/lodge costs, full board/a cook,English speaking guides, porters, 4×4 vehicle, camping equipment, unlimited game viewing within park opening hours, if not stated otherwise under a specific tour.

Items of personal nature (e.g. toiletries, phone calls, souvenirs, bottled water, beer, cigarettes etc.), medical and personal insurance, accommodation and meals before/after the tour and tipping to the crew are not included in our prices.

+ How much is a good tip?

A tip is not included in our prices; an amount of the tip depends on your appreciation of the received services. An estimation of 5-10% of the total you have paid for your tour can be considered as a tip to the crew. In general, one can say that 5-10 USD per day is a good tip for a guide and a cook. A porter can get 5 USD per day. Given amounts are for the group, not per person.

+ We are a group of 7 people. Do we get a discount?

Certainly. We have prepared special rates for larger groups. Since the discount depends on the tours you have chosen, please contact us for additional information.

+ I am alone. How can I join others for a safari or a trek?

If you are flexible about departure dates and itineraries, we could sign you up to one of our groups with other people who have already booked. Take a look also for our Special Promotions and Last-Minute Deals, where we advertise tours for people to join in.

+ Do I get a discount if I book both, a safari and a trekking tour with your company?

Definitely. The percentage of the discount however, depends on the tours you have chosen. Please, contact us for more information.

+ How do I proceed with my reservation and payment?

Booking from abroad – once you have agreed on a specific tour and the price, a 25%-50% deposit payment (bank transfer) will be required. Your booking will be confirmed upon receiving your deposit, and a confirmation sent to you via e-mail. The deposit will be used to make all the necessary reservations. If not agreed otherwise the remaining balance is to be paid cash upon arrival in Arusha. See more in Terms & Conditions.

In town, there is an ATM machine and several banks and exchange offices if you choose to bring Traveller’s Cheque’s or Credit Card (more). Please note, that US$ cash notes older than 1996 are not accepted in Tanzania and that exchange rate is higher for 50 and 100 US$ notes compared to 20, 10, 5, 1 US$ notes.

+ Can I use Euro’s in Tanzania?

Absolutely, the Euro (as any other »hard« currency) can be easily exchanged into Tanzanian Shillings (Tsh) in any bank or exchange office. However, since it is not (yet) used for payment of the national park entrance fees, we would still require a payment in US dollars.

+ How can I travel from Arusha to Zanzibar?

The fastest way is by flying; a direct domestic flight to Zanzibar will take approximately one hour; you can purchase the ticket in our office. If you choose a luxury coach, it will take approximately nine hours to reach Dar es Salaam and another three hours by ferry. Since the last ferry departs from Dar es Salaam early in the afternoon, you will probably have to stay overnight.

+ I am a female traveler. Any advice?

Take precaution as you would in any unfamiliar area. Do not walk alone after dark, do not show off your valuables, and do not leave your drink on the table when you go to the toilet.

Follow the dress code; do not wear skimpy outfits and do not show your cleavage, it will only bring unwanted attention. In Muslim areas (especially in the cities in Zanzibar) as well as in remote villages, cover your knees and shoulders. For some reason, locals get excited when they see women in tight trousers/shorts. Tight capri pants are not a good idea unless you crave for attention and men whistling and shouting.

Be firm but polite when saying no to an invitation (and you can expect many invitations to the disco and even marriage proposals!).

Be smart, and avoid uncomfortable situations.

And most important of all – do not walk around with constant fear; the chances that something bad will happen are very low! So, enjoy your holiday and relax!

+ When is the best time to visit the parks?

Serengeti National Park: all year round;
Ngorongoro Conservation Area: all year round;
Lake Manyara National Park: all year round;
Tarangire National Park: dry season;
Arusha National Park: all year round;
Kilimanjaro National Park: all year round.

+ Suitcase or backpack?

Actually it depends on where you are going and your means of transport. If you have chosen a lodge safari and flying between the mainland and the coast, a suitcase would be acceptable otherwise bring a backpack. Some air charters limit their baggage to 10-15 kg maximum (metric converter), therefore travel light. And note, that suitcases are not allowed up Mt. Kilimanjaro.

+ Can I leave excess luggage behind whilst on safari or trekking?

Yes, in most hotels you can leave your trekking equipment behind whilst on safari, or swimming suite whilst on the mountain; but on condition, that you return to the same hotel afterwards. If you wish, you can also leave the excess luggage in our office.

+ What to bring on safari?

It really depends on what type of safari you have chosen. In any case, the following is recommended:

Flashlight;
Sunscreen, Lip salve;
Sunglasses, Sun hat;
Insect repellent;
Binoculars;
Camera with zoom lenses;
Spare film and batteries;
Towel, Toiletries;
Long sleeved shirt;
Long trousers;
Warm sweater;
Sleeping bag;
Small daypack.

+ What if it rains?

In the Northern Circuit, the longer rain season (masika) starts in mid March and ends in May. There is also a short rain season (vuli) for approximately two weeks in November. Contrary to beliefs, it does not rain all day long; rain showers are usually in the evenings, during the night and in the early mornings. Normally, it does not influence the game viewing. If you are planning to go on a basic camping safari, be prepared for the rains, and bring water-proof gear. Tents are waterproof and can stand heavy showers.

+ When is the best time to visit the parks?

Serengeti National Park: all year round (the biggest animal migrations occur from October to June);
Ngorongoro Conservation Area: all year round;
Lake Manyara National Park: all year round;
Tarangire National Park: dry season;
Arusha National Park: all year round.

+ How close do I get to the animals?

It is important to follow the park regulations. The guide is not allowed to drive off the tracks to approach animals. Normally, the guide should keep a distance of at least 25 meters from the animals; however, some animals actually come near vehicles or stay close to the tracks. So, you will most likely get »up close and personal« with the wildlife, sometimes close enough to reach out and touch the animals. As much as it sounds good, it is not a good idea; remember that the parks are not Zoos, animals are not tamed and close encounters can be dangerous! It is much better to stick to your camera!

+ Do your vehicles have open roofs?

All vehicles are custom made for safaris with pop-up roofs for outstanding viewing. But be careful, sun can get very hot during the day and to avoid sunburn do not forget to wear sunscreen or maybe long sleeves!

+ Is there a lot of driving between the parks?

This is in fact dependant on your itinerary! If you would like to see as many parks as possible and are limited in time, you will be spending more time on transfers between the parks compared to longer itineraries. Lake Manyara, Tarangire and Arusha National Parks are situated not too far from Arusha town (from 30 minutes up to three hours). Serengeti and Ngorongoro are more distant, and to fully enjoy these parks you should consider at least a 4-5 day tour. And one more thing, the game viewing in the national parks can be done only within the park opening hours, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.!

+ What is included in your prices and what are additional costs?

All our prices are quoted in US dollars (US$) per person and in general consist of park entrance fees, rescue fees, camping/hut/lodge costs, full board/a cook, English speaking guide, 4×4 vehicle, camping equipment, unlimited game viewing within park opening hours, if not stated otherwise under a specific tour.

Items of personal nature (e.g. toiletries, phone calls, souvenirs, bottled water, beer, cigarettes etc.), accommodation and meals before/after the tour, medical and personal insurance, and tipping to the crew are not included in our prices.

When on safari, if you would like to stop at Maasai villages to take photographs, you will have to pay an entrance fee and most likely an extra for taking pictures of the local people (this is negotiable). If you want to have a stopover at the Olduvai Gorge, you will need to pay a moderate entrance fee.

+ Do I have to pay extra for taking pictures inside the parks?

No. You can film and photograph as much as you want, so remember to bring spare batteries and film. But note that most likely you will be asked to pay if you take pictures of the locals. However, professional TV crews need to apply for special filming permits. Contact us for additional information.

+ We are a group of 7 people. Do we get a discount?

Certainly. We have prepared special rates for larger groups. Since the discount depends on the tour you have chosen, please contact us for additional information.

+ I am alone. How can I join others for a safari?

If you are flexible about departure dates and itineraries, we could sign you up to one of our groups with other people who have already booked. Take a look also for our Special Promotions and Last Minute Deals, where we advertise tours for people to join in.

+ We are a couple. Can we go on safari by ourselves?

Certainly you can go on your own private safari, together with your driver guide and a cook, if you decide for a basic camping option. But please note that the price is dependant on the number of people on safari.

+ Suitcase or backpack for safari?

Actually it depends on the tour that you have chosen; if you have decided for a lodge safari and flying between the mainland and the coast, a suitcase would be acceptable, otherwise bring a backpack.

+ We are interested to see Haadzabe Bushmen at Lake Eyasi. How can we get there and what type of activities are offered?

Some of our pre-arranged Safari Tours already include a visit to Haadzabe; however when you book any safari with us, you can add two days to visit the Haadzabe tribe in Lake Eyasi. It can be added to your itinerary after visiting Lake Manyara or on the way from Ngorongoro and Serengeti back to Arusha.

We can also arrange to see »the Bushmen« if you decide for the Ngorongoro Crater Highlands trek (more).

In Lake Eyasi the most exiting activity is to go hunting with »the real Bushmen« and thus experience how to survive in the wilderness! You can learn something about their unique way of living and unusual customs and traditions. Sightseeing around Lake Eyasi can be arranged as well, where large flocks of flamingoes can be observed.

+ Can I leave excess luggage behind whilst on safari?

Yes, in most hotels you can leave behind what you don’t need on safari; but on condition, that you return to the same hotel afterwards. If you wish, you can also leave the excess luggage in our office.

+ What kind of accommodation is available on safari?

Inside or outside the parks, you can choose from different types of accommodation – from campsites and budget lodges, semi-luxury tented camps to top-end lodges and exclusive luxury tented camps. It actually depends on your budget, and the selected type of your tour.

For more details have a look at our Safari Accommodation section.

+ What to bring on a trek?

It really depends which mountain you have chosen to trek. More detailed information is given in our Trekking Tips section. In any case, the following is recommended:

waterproof rucksack with daypack;
sleeping bag (covering at least 3 seasons);
roll mats and insulation pads;
comfortable hiking boots, light walking trainers, thongs (flip-flops);
gaiters (useful when encountering snow)
wooden walking stick/ski pole;
sunglasses or snow-goggles;
sun hat;
balaclava or woolen hat;
warm scarf;
gloves and mittens;
thermal underwear;
sweaters/jumpers;
anorak/raincoat;
water and windproof pants and jacket;
t-shirt and long sleeved shirt with collar;
several pairs of socks;
small towel, toiletries, toilet paper;
sunscreen and lip salve;
first-aid kit and insect repellant;
flashlight (head-mounted preferable);
spare batteries;
pocket knife;
sewing/repair kit;
water bottle;
whistle;
some plastic bags;
camera with spare film and batteries;
notepad with pen/pencil.

+ When is the best time to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro, Mt. Meru and Ngorongoro Crater Highlands?

Crater Highlands in Ngorongoro Conservation Area: all year round;
Mt. Meru in Arusha National Park: all year round;
Kilimanjaro National Park: all year round.

+ Does climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro involve technicalities?

Not at all. If you are in good physical condition (if you are able to run for half an hour or more without feeling short of breath) you can climb and reach the summit.

Anybody with a sore throat, cold or breathing problems should stay below 3000 meters.

People with cardiac, pulmonary/respiratory or high/low blood pressure problems and the ones undergoing medical treatment should not attempt the mountain at all without consulting their doctors.

Being in the right mental state is also very important; do not push yourself to go if your body is exhausted, or if you have extreme mountain sickness or more serious symptoms.

Acclimatization is a state without Altitude Illness

+ Can children climb Mt. Kilimanjaro?

According to the Kilimanjaro National Park Authorities, the minimum age limit for trekking to the Uhuru Peak is 12 years old.

+ Which route do you recommend for Mt. Kilimanjaro?

We highly recommend the Machame Route, as long as it is done in six days and the Arrow Glacier shortcut is avoided; but do note that overnight is possible only in tents! For those who want to have the comfort of sleeping in the huts, the Marangu route is the only option.

Machame Route is also known as the »Whisky route« and if you choose it, you will see much more of the mountain, as you are ascending from Machame Village to the Uhuru peak and then descending to Mweka Village. You will see much more of the landscape, and acclimatization is done while you are walking (you will be trekking through Karranga Valley and gaining minimal height while keeping yourself active and enjoying the scenery).

The most popular, and sometimes quite crowded, the Marangu Route is also known as the »Coca Cola route«. Choosing this route, you will be ascending and descending on the same path and acclimatization is usually done by one-day resting in the huts.

The trek to the Uhuru peak is hard in both routes, but the advantage of the Machame Route is that it is less steep compared to Marangu Route, and most people spend less time reaching the peak than in Marangu.

+ What is the weather like on Mt. Kilimanjaro ?

Equatorial to arctic conditions are present on Mt. Kilimanjaro. The range begins with the warm, dry plains with average temperatures of 30 degrees Celsius, ascends through a wide belt of wet tropical forest, through zones with generally decreasing temperatures and rainfall, to the summit where there is permanent ice and below freezing temperatures. The temperature at the top of the mountain can get as low as minus 25 degrees Celsius (metric converter).

+ How many guides, cooks and porters will accompany us?

All depends on the number of people in the group. You will have one leading guide, with assistant guides serving as porters, a cook and porters.

+ What if one of us gets sick and has to return?

In case one person gets sick and has to stay behind or even return, he/she will be accompanied by one of the assistant guides while the rest of the group will continue with the leading guide.

+ How many people make it to the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro, the Uhuru Peak?

If you are in a good physical condition and plan enough time to climb the mountain, the odds that you will not reach the Uhuru peak are minimal. People, who do not reach the summit, either get too exhausted or are suffering from strong headaches and nausea due to the altitude. The best advice is to take it slow, drink lots of water and pay attention to the symptoms of the altitude illness

+ Can I climb Mt. Meru or Mt. Kilimanjaro independently?

You can not climb Mt. Kilimanjaro if it is not organized through a licensed company. There are strict rules regarding guides, porters and weight of the luggage.

You can arrange a trek to Mt. Meru on your own. But booking with a company has many benefits since you do not need to arrange for the food by yourself, porters will carry all your supplies and you will be in safe hands should anything unexpected happen. Even if you arrange a trek on your own, there are rules to be followed and it is obligatory that an armed ranger accompany you. You are also not allowed to carry more than 15kg (metric converter).

+ We are interested to see Haadzabe Bushmen in Lake Eyasi. How can we get there and what type of activities are offered?

Some of our pre-arranged Safari Tours already include a visit to Haadzabe; however when you book any safari with us, you can add two days to visit the Haadzabe tribe in Lake Eyasi. It can be added to your itinerary after visiting Lake Manyara or on the way from Ngorongoro and Serengeti back to Arusha.

We can also arrange to see »the Bushmen« if you decide for the Ngorongoro Crater Highlands trek

In Lake Eyasi the most exiting activity is to go hunting with »the real Bushmen« and thus experience how to survive in the wilderness! You can learn something about their unique way of living and unusual customs and traditions. Sightseeing around Lake Eyasi can be arranged as well, where large flocks of flamingoes can be observed.

+ Why is the Ngorongoro Crater Highlands trek so expensive?

On the Ngorongoro Crater Highlands trek the special campsites are used (there are no public ones) which are twice the price of the public ones. There are also a number of people escorting you. Beside our trained walking guide, an armed ranger from the Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority and Maasai warriors will accompany you while on trek as well as donkeys to carry your supplies and also assist you at times when you might feel too tired to walk by yourselves

+ What is included in your prices and what are additional costs?

All our prices are quoted in US dollars (US$) per person and in general consist of park entrance fees, rescue fees, camping/hut fees, full board/a cook, English speaking guides, porters, 4×4 vehicle, camping equipment, if not stated otherwise under a specific tour.

Items of personal nature (e.g. toiletries, phone calls, souvenirs, bottled water, beer, cigarettes etc.), medical and personal insurance, accommodation and meals before/after the tour and tipping to the crew are not included in our prices.

+ How much is a good tip?

A tip is not included in our prices; an amount of the tip depends on your appreciation of the received services. An estimation of 5-10% of the total you have paid for your tour can be considered as a tip to the crew. In general, one can say that 5-10 USD per day is a good tip for a guide and a cook. A porter can get 5 USD per day. Given amounts are for the group, not per person.

+ We are a group of 7 people. Do we get a discount?

Certainly. We have prepared special rates for larger groups. Since the discount depends on the tours you have chosen, please contact us for additional information.

+ I am alone. How can I join others for a trek?

If you are flexible about departure dates and itineraries, we could sign you up to one of our groups with other people who have already booked. Take a look also for our Special Promotions and Last Minute Deals, where we advertise tours for people to join in.

+ Can I leave excess luggage behind whilst on trekking?

Yes, in most hotels you can leave behind what you don’t need on a trek; but on condition, that you return to the same hotel afterwards. If you wish, you can also leave the excess luggage in our office.

+ When is the best time to visit Zanzibar?

You can enjoy holidays on Zanzibar throughout the whole year! It is a tropical island and showers can be expected but they are usually quite short, except during the longer rainy season (masika), when sometimes it can rain throughout the night!

+ Can I wear shorts in Stone Town?

Zanzibar is an island with 99% Muslim population and out of respect to their religious conviction it is not courteous to wear shorts and sleeveless shirts in Stone Town, especially if you are a woman (shoulders and knees should be covered). The same applies also for wearing swim suits in the local villages near your hotel/lodge. However, you can definitely wear beach clothes in the beach areas! And one more thing, topless and nude bathing are prohibited.

+ Can the month of Ramadan affect my holidays and if yes, in what way?

If you intend to stay most of your time in your hotel and make a full use of their facilities (especially restaurants), the month of Ramadan will have no effect to your holiday. It can be a little challenging if you feel like eating out or visit Stone Town, as most restaurants and shops close by day but do stay open longer then usual in the evening. During Ramadan take particular attention to what you wear (cover your shoulders and knees) and show respect by not eating, drinking or smoking in the street or other public places during the day. A great time to be on Zanzibar is though at the end of the wholly month, on Eid el-Fitr, with feasting, merrymaking and firecrackers.

+ How can I travel from Arusha to Zanzibar?

The fastest way is by flying; a direct domestic flight to Zanzibar will take approximately one hour; you can purchase the ticket in our office. If you choose a luxury coach, it will take approximately nine hours to reach Dar es Salaam and another three hours by ferry. Since the last ferry departs from Dar es Salaam early in the afternoon, you will probably have to stay overnight in Dar es Salaam.

While in Tanzania, exchange a few words also in the local Swahili language (Kiswahili). It is not as hard as it looks and you will be surprised on people’s warm response!

It’s easy – words are pronounced exactly as they are written, with the stress nearly always on the second-to-last syllable. Here are a few phrases to help you getting started!

+ Greetings – Salaam

Jambo!

Hello! (common greeting for tourists)

Jambo!

Reply: »Hello!«

Habari za asubuhi/leo/mchana/jioni.

Good morning/day/afternoon/evening.

Habari?

How are you?

Nzuri/salama.

Good/fine.

Shikamoo.

Respectful greeting to elder.

Marahaba.

Their reply: »I am delighted.«

Mambo?

How are things?

Vipi?

What’s up?

Poa/safi/fresh.

Cool/nice/fresh.

Tuta onana baadaye!

See you later!

Hakuna matata!

No problem!

Karibu!/Karibu tena!

Welcome!/Welcome again!

Asante!/Asante sana!

Thank you!/Thank you very much!

Ndiyo/Hapana.

Yes/No.

Kwaheri.

Goodbye.

Safari njema.

Have a good trip.
+ Meeting People – Utambulisho

Jina lako nani?/Unaitwa nani?

What’s your name?

Jina langu ni …/Naitwa …

My name is …

Una miaka mingapi?

How old are you?

Nina miaka …

I am …

Unatokea wapi?

Where do you come from?

Mimi ninatokea …

I come from …

Unafanya kazi gani?

What work do you do?

Mimi ni mwanafunzi.

I am a student.

Ninafanya kazi hospitali.

I am working in a hospital.

Kwa nini umekuja hapa?

What have you come here for?

Kwenye livu/kutalii.

For a holiday/tourism.

Umekaa siku ngapi hapa?

How long have you been here?

Nimekaa hapa siku/wiki/mwezi 1 (moja).

I’ve been here 1 day/week/month.
+ Facing the touts – Kukutana na wasumbufu

Samahani, sina muda.

Sorry, I don’t have time.

Sitaki kununua chochote!

I don’t want to buy anything!

Tayari nimeisha lipia safari.

I have already booked a safari.

Sina hela.

I don’t have money.

Nina mchumba.

I’m not single.

Achana na mimi./Chukua time.

Can you please leave me alone?

Hayakuhusu!

It is none of your business!
+ On the move – Kenye mizunguko

Teksi iko wapi?

Where can I get a taxi?

Ni shilingi ngapi kwenda …?

How much to go to ….?

Stesheni ya basi iko wapi?

Where is the bus station?

Basi inaondoka saa ngapi?

When is the bus leaving?

Tutafika saa ngapi?

What time will we arrive?

Unaweza kunionesha basi?

Can you show me the bus?

Tikiti ni bei gani?

How much is the ticket?

Ni salama kutembea hapa usiku?

Is it safe to walk here at night?
+ Accommodation – Malazi

Kuna hoteli hapa karibu?

Is there a hotel nearby?

Tunahitaji mahali pa kukaa.

We need a place to stay.

Je, kuna nafasi ya chumba hapa?

Do you have a room?

Je, kuna maji ya moto?

Is there a hot water?

Ni bei gani kwa usiku?

How much per night?
+ In the Restaurant – Kwenye mgahawa

Hoteli iko wapi?

Where is the restaurant?

Nataka chakulacha kizungu/kiafrika.

I want European/African food.

Tafadhali, nipe menu?

Can I have the menu, please?

Ninapenda kuagiza.

I would like to order.

Tafadhali, naomba maji?

Can I have some water, please?

Mimi nataka wali na kuku.

I would like some rice and chicken.

Sili nyama.

I don’t eat meat.

Nipe bili tafadhali.

Please, bring me the bill.

Chakula hiki ni kitamu.

The food is delicious!
+ Food/Drinks – Chakula/Kinywaji

Moto

Hot

Matunda

Fruits

Baridi

Cold

Ndizi

Banana

Mkate

Bread

Embe

Mango

Siagi/blue band

Butter/margarine

Embe mafuta

Avocado

Yai (mayai)

Egg(s)

Nanasi

Pineapple

Mboga

Vegetable

Papai

Papaya

Kiazi ulaya

Potato

Chungwa

Orange

Karoti

Carrot

Tikiti maji

Water melon

Nyanya

Tomato

Tikiti

Melon

Kitunguu

Onion

Limau

Lemon

Mahindi

Corn/maize

Nazi

Coconut

Maharagwe

Beans

Apol

Apple

Pilipili

Chili

Kinywaji

Drinks

Saladi

Salad

Maji ya kunywa

Water (for drinking)

Mchicha

Spinach

Maji safi

Mineral water

Kiazi

Sweet potato

Maziwa

Milk

Nyama

Meat

Kahawa
(ya rangi/ya maziwa)

Coffee
(black/with milk)

Kuku

Chicken

Chai
(ya rangi/ya maziwa)

Tea
(black/with milk)

Ng’ombe

Beef

Soda

Soda

Nguruwe

Pork

Juisi

Juice

Kondoo

Lamb

Bia

Beer

Samaki

Fish

Mvinyo

Wine
+ How much did you say? – Umesema bei gani?

1

Moja

30

Thelathini

2

Mbili

40

Arobaini

3

Tatu

50

Hamsini

4

Nne

60

Sitini

5

Tano

70

Sabini

6

Sita

80

Themanini

7

Saba

90

Tisini

8

Nane

100

Mia moja

9

Tisa

500

Mia tano

10

Kumi

1000

Elfu moja

11

Kumi na moja

2000

Elfu mbili

12

Kumi na mbili

10.000

Elfu kumi

20

Ishirini

100.000

Laki

21

Ishirini na moja

1.000.000

Milioni moja
+ Animals – Wanyama

Simba

Lion

Choroa

Oryx

Chui

Leopard

Dikidiki

Dikdik

Duma

Cheetah

Kongoni

Hartebeest

Tembo

Elephant

Korongo

Roan Antelope

Nyati

Buffalo

Kuru

Waterbuck

Punda milia

Zebra

Palahala

Sable Antelope

Kifaru

Rhinoceros

Pofu

Eland

Fisi

Hyena

Pongo/Paa

Bushbuck

Twiga

Giraffe

Swala granti

Grant’s Gazelle

Kiboko

Hippopotamus

Swala tomi

Thomson’s Gazelle

Mamba

Crocodile

Swala twiga

Gerenuk

Ngiri

Warthog

Swala/pala

Impala

Nyoka

Snake

Tandala

Kudu

Nyumbu

Wildebeest/Gnu

Komba

Bushbaby

Heroe

Flamingo

Simbamangu

Caracal

Mbuni

Ostrich

Tai

Vulture

Mbwa mwitu

Wild dog

Mbu

Mosquito

Mbweha

Jackal

Siafu

Ant

Mondo

Serval

Paka

Cat

Nyemera

Topi

Mbwa

Dog

Nyani

Baboon

Ng’ombe

Cow

Mbega

Colobus

Nguruwe

Pig

Sokwe

Chimpanzee

Kuku

Chicken

Tumbili

Monkey

Samaki

Fish

Do you know how many miles is 154 kilometres or how many degrees Fahrenheit is 29 degrees Celsius? It can be quite complicated converting units from metric to imperial system and vice-versa, especially if you are using them every now and then. In Tanzania a metric system is used and for easier understanding, we prepared this metric converter for visitors arriving from imperial states!

+ Distance and Length:

Kilometres to Miles

multiply by 0.62

Miles to Kilometres

multiply by 1.61

Meters to Yards

multiply by 1.09

Yards to Meters

multiply by 0.91

Meters to Feet

multiply by 3.28

Feet to Meters

multiply by 0.30

Centimetres to Inches

multiply by 0.39

Inches to Centimetres

multiply by 2.54

+ Temperature:

From degrees Celsius to degrees Fahrenheit

multiply by 1.8 and add 32

From degrees Fahrenheit to degrees Celsius

Subtract 32 and divide by 1.8

+ Weight:

Kilograms to Pounds

multiply by 2.21

Pounds to Kilograms

multiply by 0.45

Grams to Ounces

multiply by 0.035

Ounces to Grams

multiply by 28.35

+ Volume:

Litres to Imperial Gallons

multiply by 0.22

Imperial Gallons to Litres

multiply by 4.55

Litres to US Gallons

multiply by 0.26

US Gallons to Litres

multiply by 3.79